Remains of the Turpentine Industry

shiloh_edit1[copyright 2012 Far Enough Photo]

Pine gum and turpentine have been harvested from the expansive pine forests of the eastern U.S. since early European settlers arrived. This forest product would develop in to an important industry based in the Carolinas, Georgia and Florida.

turpentine_bpxedpines

[Turpentine trees cut with ‘Catfaces’ where pine tar or pine gum is harvested to make turpentine; Central Florida turpentine farm, c. 1930’s **Photo courtesy and property of the Florida Memory Project**]

turpentine_workersorig1[**Photo courtesy and property of the Florida Memory Project**]

From 1909-1923, Florida would experience a turpentine boom, leading the nation in pine gum production. Many camps for workers popped up all over North Central Florida during this period.

turpentine_originalcamp[Central Florida turpentine camp c. 1920’s **Photo courtesy and property of the Florida Memory Project**]

turpentine_stillorig1[Worker’s at a Central Florida turpentine still c. early 1900’s **Photo courtesy and property of the Florida Memory Project**]

shiloh7[copyright 2013 Far Enough Photo]

shiloh_6[copyright 2013 Far Enough Photo]

Built by Cecil Pardee on behalf of D.R. Zetrouer for workers at his turpentine still are these simple shacks, three of about seven still standing from one such camp.
[Marion County, FL c. early 1900’s]

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One response to “Remains of the Turpentine Industry”

  1. dirtmedic says :

    Great photos. This last two weeks I have found two turpentine camps and have been doing some reading up on these camps. Very interesting part of Florida history.

    Like

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